Dairy Australia updates resources

09 Oct, 2017 09:00 AM
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The new editions of two popular Dairy Australia resources.
The way we care for all calves on dairy farms can have major and long-lasting effects.
The new editions of two popular Dairy Australia resources.

TWO of Dairy Australia's most popular publications - InCalf and Rearing Healthy Calves - have been updated with the latest technical and scientific information.

The much-anticipated update of the popular InCalf book was available for farmers to order for free from late August. The book pulls together the latest knowledge on dairy herd fertility, drawing on the InCalf program's extensive on-farm research, as well as a wide range of experts.

Herd fertility is the net result of a large number of management decisions and practices that occur throughout the year across key areas including heifer rearing, transition cow nutrition, heat detection, bull management, early pregnancy testing and accurate record keeping - all subjects explored in the updated book.

Recognising the diversity of farm systems now in place in Australia, a companion InCalf Farm Case Studies booklet has been published highlighting the importance of good herd fertility management to successful, profitable farm businesses. The booklet, featuring seven different farm scenarios and farmer case studies, is the result of an in-depth research survey into consistently highly profitable farms, exploring the links between their farm financial and reproductive performance.

The case studies include at least one representative of each of the common calving systems (seasonal single, split, year-round) and across different calving times (spring and autumn) and milk supply patterns providing relatable examples for most Australian farmers.

Rearing Healthy Calves was first published in 2011 and has proven extremely popular with farmers and calf rearers, with about 12,000 copies of the original publication circulated.

The manual offers farmers ideas on how to enhance the way they manage calves, with the benefits flowing right through the supply chain.

In his forward to the updated version of Rearing Healthy Calves, Dairy Australia managing director Ian Halliday said dairyfarmers made decisions every day that could affect the health and welfare of their calves.

"This manual combines clear and concise explanations with practical examples to help you see a range of approaches in action," he said.

"The way we care for all calves on dairy farms can have major and long-lasting effects: not just at the farm level, but throughout the industry, where issues such as animal welfare, animal diseases and food safety can have significant consequences."D

Hard copies of both InCalf and Rearing Healthy Calves can be ordered for free from the new Dairy Australia website at https://www.dairyaustralia.com.au/farm/animal-management/fertility/incalf-books.

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