Innovation on agenda in Tas

30 Mar, 2017 08:42 AM
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INNOVATIVE FARMER: Joe Hammond talks to attendees on the DairyTas pre-conference farm tour at his Legana dairy farm. Picture: Neil Richardson.
Our automatic feeders have saved labour and produce a more even feed for the calves.
INNOVATIVE FARMER: Joe Hammond talks to attendees on the DairyTas pre-conference farm tour at his Legana dairy farm. Picture: Neil Richardson.

DairyTas Conference farm tour attendees visited four Tasmanian businesses that have thrived despite challenges.

Joe Hammond’s dairy farm at Legana was the last stop on the tour, which also included a visit to Grant and Kim Archer’s new dairy farm at Liffey, lunch at Goaty Hill Winery and Van Diemen’s Aquaculture salmon farm.

Joe and Tamara Hammond live and work at the Legana dairy farm with their children Henry, 5, George, 3, and Hayley, 11 months.

Mr Hammond has managed the dairy farm for the past 15 years with his uncle, after taking over from his mother.

There are 450 dairy cows are the farm now, but it can accommodate up to 600, and supplies 190,000 kilograms of milk solids to Fonterra each season.

Attendees were eager to see the Hammonds' autumn calves and innovative irrigation techniques.

“Our automatic feeders have saved labour and produce a more even feed for the calves because they get the right amount,” Mr Hammond said.

He also explained how the family used Legana waste water in their irrigation system for pasture management.

This pre-conference tour focused on how different businesses thrived, a topic that will be explored further at the 10th annual DairyTas conference at Country Club Casino, Prospect Vale, this week.

DairyTas executive officer Mark Smith said the theme was Managing the Challenge of Change, which “reflects the challenging year faced by most dairyfarmers across the state. We are now moving out of this trough as the seasonal conditions have improved and global commodity prices pick up”.

The Advocate

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