Dairy welcomes CHAFTA start

11 Dec, 2015 11:30 AM
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The entire dairy value chain, led by the ADIC, has lobbied strongly for the implementation of ChAFTA.
In the long term, this will mean more jobs across the Australian dairy industry.
The entire dairy value chain, led by the ADIC, has lobbied strongly for the implementation of ChAFTA.

The Australian Dairy Industry Council (ADIC) has applauded the confirmation that the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) will enter into force on December 20.

ADIC chair Simone Jolliffe said the dairy industry was extremely pleased that the historic agreement would be ratified before the end of the 2015 calendar year.

“The entire dairy value chain, led by the ADIC, has lobbied strongly for the implementation of ChAFTA and we are pleased to see its entry into force,” Mrs Jolliffe said.

“On 20 December, Australian dairy exporters will experience the first year’s tranche of tariff reductions. This will be followed by a second round of tariff cuts on 1 January 2016.”

“In the long term, this will mean more jobs across the Australian dairy industry both on farm and in processing plants. It will provide our industry with the confidence it needs to invest for a strong future.”

The ADIC thanked the Minister for Trade and Investment, Andrew Robb, and his team of negotiators as well as the Australian government, industry and the broader dairy community for its ongoing support and for ensuring the deal will be ratified in the 2015 calendar year.

Australian Dairy Industry Council

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