Teat spray robot saves labour

10 Jul, 2018 12:00 PM
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This new dairy has been designed around cow comfort, ease of operation and amazing technology...

At the Dornauf family dairy at Moltema, Tasmania, one person can milk 600 cows.

That’s because in recent weeks Dornauf Dairies has installed the latest technology in rotary milking – the DeLaval Rotary E100 and a Teat Spray Robot.

Buying additional land and increasing their herd from 240 to 600 demanded a farewell to the 50-year-old dairy that was on the property and the investment they’ve made not only solves labour force problems but ensures viability in the future.

Local Agri-Tech Services consultant Laurie Hooper was involved in the design and set-up of the $1.6 million facility and will be in charge of Agri-Tech’s ongoing maintenance and 24/7 support.

It’s a relationship with the family and Dornauf Dairies that has spanned 30 years – the past 21 through Agri-Tech.

“The Dornaufs, who own five dairy farms, put in the world’s first commercial robotic rotary dairy seven years ago – they don’t mind a bit of technology,” Laurie said.

“This new dairy has been designed around cow comfort, ease of operation and amazing technology to control the platform.

“The OH&S aspect revolves around a clever safety system and the robotic teat spray not only does an exceptional job but is perfectly consistent.”

The DeLaval Rotary E100 is the result of a multi-million dollar development programme to create the ultimate rotary for farming conditions in Australia.

DeLaval says the new system has set a benchmark for rotaries.

“We’re thrilled that the Australian and New Zealand markets are the first in the world to have access to the DeLaval Rotary E100,” DeLaval’s Oceania sales director Justin Thompson said.

“The grassland systems that are popular in Oceania present particular challenges to efficient and profitable milking, and we’ve put a huge amount of engineering effort into ensuring this meets the unique demands of pasture-based dairy farming.”

Mr Thompson said that the technology built into the machine was designed around on-farm priorities for farmers looking to measurably improve animal welfare, farm profitability, worker efficiency and milk quality.

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